Standing in the 2022 Election

  • Early March

    Letter to households confirming who is registered to vote

  • 10 March

    Final date that propositions can be lodged by the current States Assembly

  • 4 April

    Registration for Postal Voting opens

  • 25 April

    Final States Meeting of the current term

  • 10 May at 12pm

    Deadline to register for the main electoral register

  • 11 May

    Pre-election period begins (note: during the pre-election period, States Members and the Government have restrictions on how they can communicate and act in a political capacity)

  • 11-13 May

    Nominations open for both Deputies and Connétables. Forms to be submitted to the Jersey Electoral Authority, Morier House, Halkett Place, St Helier

  • 13 May at 5pm

    Nominations close

  • 18 May

    All Election ’22 candidates announced on Vote.je and to the media

  • 1 June

    Registration for Postal Voting closes

  • Early June

    Booklets to all households with details of the candidates in their district

  • 13 – 17 June

    Pre-poll open at St Paul’s Centre, St Helier

  • 15 June at 12pm

    Deadline to register for the supplementary register

  • 17 June at 12pm

    The completed ballot papers and other documentation must be returned to the Judicial Greffe in order for the vote to be included in the count

  • June

    Hustings

  • 22 June

    Election Day

  • 27 June

    Successful candidates are sworn in at the Royal Court

  • 30 June

    Nominations close for Chief Minister

  • 5 July

    States Assembly for the Chief Minister take place

  • 11 – 12 July

    Ministerial nominations tabled by the Chief Minister designate and election of Scrutiny Chairs

  • 19 – 21 July

    States Assembly election for Members of Scrutiny Panels and Committees take place

Manifesto

If you decide to stand for election, when you submit your nomination form you will also need to provide a written manifesto, explaining why you’re standing for election, and what you believe in. The word count is 500 words. You’ll also need to provide a digital photograph.

Both the photo and your manifesto will appear on the Vote.je website, and in a candidate manifesto booklet which will be sent to all Islanders before the election.

Hustings

As part of your campaign, you’ll have the opportunity to speak at hustings. These are meetings where members of the public can ask all the candidates questions.

Campaign Spending Limits

The campaign spending limit for both Deputies and Constables is £2,050, plus 13p per person entitled to vote in the Parish or constituency in which you’re standing for election.

Based on the number of voters appearing on the main electoral registers for the election on 22 June 2022, the expenditure limits for candidates are as follows:

Grouville and St Martin

Candidates for Connétable of Grouville = £2,528.92

Candidates for Connétable of St Martin = £2,401.52

Candidates for Deputy of Grouville and St Martin = £2,880.44

St John, St Lawrence and Trinity

Candidates for Connétable of St John = £2,346.40

Candidates for Connétable of St Lawrence = £2,531.91

Candidates for Connétable of Trinity = £2,302.59

Candidates for Deputy of St John, St Lawrence and Trinity = £3,080.90

St Mary, St Ouen and St Peter

Candidates for Connétable of St Mary = £2,226.41

Candidates for Connétable of St Ouen = £2,411.79

Candidates for Connétable of St Peter = £2,483.81

Candidates for Deputy of St Mary, St Ouen and St Peter = £3,022.01

St Clement

Candidates for Connétable and Deputy of St Clement = £2,838.71

St Saviour

Candidates for Connétable and Deputy of St Saviour  = £3,024.87

St Brelade

Candidates for Connétable and Deputy of St Brelade = £3,082.33

St Helier

Candidates for Connétable of St Helier = £4,152.88

Candidates for Deputy of St Helier South = £2,668.93

Candidates for Deputy of St Helier Central = £2,704.03

Candidates for Deputy of St Helier North = £2,879.92

An extra 13p may be spent for each voter who appears on the supplementary registers which close on 15 June.

Election expenses

In general the approach within the law is that election expenses are:

  • incurred at any time before the poll
  • for the supply / use of goods / provision of services used during the regulated period
  • to promote or procure the election of the candidate / the political party’s candidates
  • to prejudice the electoral prospects of other candidates / another political party

The JEA accepts that not every page of a website may be intended to promote or procure the election of candidates (or prejudice others’ chances) –  for example, there may be a neutral “contact us” page – albeit that the starting point is likely to be that much of the website content is likely to be geared towards that aim. Sensible and reasonable judgments should be taken as to what proportion of such costs should be included as election expenses (keeping written records relating to the site content and reasoning behind such judgments).

With respect to the ongoing use of content, for example, a page about a candidate which is intended to be displayed during and after the regulated period, the JEA’s view is that any costs of designing the page should be included in full and not pro-rated over the likely lifetime of the website (so long as the material seeks to promote or procure the candidate’s election as set out above).

The Jersey Electoral Authority (JEA) will conduct an audit of candidates’ expenditure after the elections to make sure everybody declares what they have spent and that they have kept within the spending limits.

FAQs

Can I advertise on roads?

Election advertising material must not be placed on the reverse side of existing road signs as all highway authority road signs are statutory signs. It is therefore inappropriate to adjust these in any way which may undermine the integrity of the information or the stability of the existing sign

Do I have to say I’m in a party when I stand?

If you are standing as a member of a party, you need to sign a declaration on the nomination form before you get others to second you.

Do I have to stand as an individual?

Candidates can stand as individuals or join one of Jersey’s political parties.

Do I need any specific qualifications or experience to stand for election?

You do not need any qualifications or experience to stand for election. You simply need to meet the eligibility requirements, and be willing to do the job.

Do I need to translate my manifesto?

Translations are at your discretion. Any translated content will count towards your 500 word count, so be mindful of this. You could translate a section or feature your translated manifesto on your own website / social media instead. You could include a translated line in the manifesto booklet, directing people to read them there. There are various translation services including Tongue Tied and The Big Word. Head to Candidate Resources page for more

How do I choose which type of States Member I want to be?

In the next States Assembly there will be two types of States members: Deputies and Constables. You can find out more about the differences between them on Vote.je

How long can my manifesto be?

Your manifesto can be up to 500 words. We will cut the printed text short if you exceed this limit. The following information will be at the top of your page in the manifesto booklets and on Vote.je and will not count towards your 500 limit: Your name, contact details, whether you’re standing independently/party affiliation and the role you are standing for. Head to the Candidate Nomination Form page for more.

How old do I have to be to stand for election?

To stand for election, candidates must be 18+ years old.

How will standing for election affect my current job?

The election period runs for nearly five weeks and you will need to be free to talk to people in your constituency and attend hustings meetings. This means that you’ll need to take some time off work. If you are a public sector worker then you may not be able to stand for election without giving up your job first. To find out more click here.

I have a criminal record; can I still stand for election?

If you stand for election you will need to complete a declaration of convictions.

I wasn’t born in Jersey; can I still stand for election?

Islanders can only stand for election if they are British Citizens and who have lived in Jersey for two years up to and including the date of the election, or if they are a British Citizen who has been resident for six months up to the election and a total of five years previously. If you want to stand for election as Constable you must also live in the Parish where you want to stand as a candidate.

I’ve stood for election before. Is there a limit to how many times I can stand for election?

There is no limit to the number of times you can stand for election, whether you have been successfully elected or not.

If elected, will I get paid?

Yes, all States Members receive an annual salary and pension. The salary will be £50,000 a year for the 2022 election.

If I formally submit my intention to stand for election, what information will be released to the public about me?

If you choose to stand for election then your name and photo will be made public. You will be invited to provide a summary to Vote.je outlining your views on Island issues so that the public know what you believe in. This will be available on Vote.je and in printed materials which will be sent to all Island households.

If successful, how long will my term as a States Member be?

States Members term of office is for four years. When a new election is called Members can stand for re-election. There is no limit to the number of times you can stand for re-election in Jersey

Is there support for me if I stand for election?

The States Greffe provides a package of free training for potential candidates. You can watch all the videos we produce via our Youtube channel.

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